Original Research

Paramedic students’ confidence and satisfaction with clinical simulations of an emergency medical care programme in South Africa: A cross-sectional study

Peter T. Sandy, John T. Meyer, Oluwaseun S. Oduniyi, Azwihangwisi H. Mavhandu-Madzusi
Health SA Gesondheid | Vol 26 | a1522 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v26i0.1522 | © 2021 Peter T. Sandy, John T. Meyer, Oluwaseun S. Oduniyi, Azwihangwisi H. Mavhandu-Mudzusi | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 July 2020 | Published: 28 April 2021

About the author(s)

Peter T. Sandy, Department of Nursing and Allied Health, Buckinghamshire New University, London, United Kingdom
John T. Meyer, Department of Emergency Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Wellness, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa
Oluwaseun S. Oduniyi, Department of Agriculture and Animal Health, Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Florida Campus, Roodepoort, South Africa
Azwihangwisi H. Mavhandu-Madzusi, Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Human Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: There has been an increase in the use of clinical simulations as instructional tools in healthcare education. This is because of their role in ensuring patients’ safety and quality-care provision.

Aim: This study investigated the paramedic students’ satisfaction and self-confidence in the clinical simulation of an emergency medical care programme.

Setting: The study was conducted at the Durban University of Technology in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. The paramedic students’ satisfaction and self-confidence in the clinical simulation of an emergency medical care programme were the focus of the study.

Methods: The study used a cross-sectional research design. A convenience sampling method was used to select the 83-paramedic students who participated in the study. Data were collected between July and September 2017 using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics (frequencies and percentages and Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficient) and an inferential test, ordinal logistic regression analysis, were used for data analysis.

Results: High levels of paramedic students’ satisfaction and self-confidence in simulation activities were reported. Generally, the paramedic students’ demographics were associated with the satisfaction and self-confidence variables with p-values ≤ 0.04. Emergency medical care training undertaken by the paramedic students was significantly associated with self-confidence (p = 0.00).

Conclusion: Clinical simulation can bridge the theory-practice gap for paramedic students. It is a hands-on approach that promotes students learning of clinical skills through reflection.


Keywords

clinical simulation; emergency medical care; paramedic; satisfaction; self-confidence

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