Original Research

The motivational needs of primary health care nurses to acquire power as leaders in a mine clinic setting

Karien Jooste, Mida Hamani
Health SA Gesondheid | Vol 22 | a961 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v22i0.961 | © 2017 Karien Jooste, Mida Hamani | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 10 October 2017 | Published: 10 October 2017

About the author(s)

Karien Jooste, School of Nursing, Faculty of Community and Health Sciences, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
Mida Hamani, Department of Nursing Science, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

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Abstract

Motivation is a process that influences and directs behaviour in order to satisfy a need. It links with goal 3 of the sustainable development goals that focus on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being at all ages. Motivation of nurses is important in the primary health care environment of, for instance, mine settings; since low levels of motivation among Primary Health Care (PHC) nurses could have a negative effect on the achievement of high standards in health service delivery. The study was conducted within the theoretical framework of McClelland's Acquired Motivation Theory which consists of three basic needs, – the need for achievement, the need for power, and the need for affiliation. One of the research questions posed was “What are the motivational needs of PHC nurses to acquire power in the workplace at mine clinic settings?” A quantitative, explorative, descriptive design was followed. The accessible population in this study was PHC nurses (N = 30) working at 13 mine clinics, that also served as the total sample. A 7 point Likert scale was used in a self-administered structured questionnaire that was developed from a literature review. Ethical considerations were adhered to and respondents gave written informed consent. Data was analysed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. TheManne Whitney test compared the mean ranks and a p-value of p < 0.05 was indicative of a significant difference between male and female groups. Validity and reliability principles were applied during the entire research process. The results indicated that PHC nurses needed acknowledgement, organisational responsibility, strategic planning and promotion, as well as support. Significant differences between gender were not found in relation to the need to acquire power.

Keywords

Motivation; Primary health care; Leader; Power; Survey

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