Original Research

Association of mode of entry to a nursing programme and student success: A two-year retrospective multi-cohort study

Fransisco C. Ntjamba, Daniel O. Ashipala, Yahaya Jafaru
Health SA Gesondheid | Vol 29 | a2560 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v29i0.2560 | © 2024 Fransisco C. Ntjamba, Daniel O. Ashipala, Yahaya Jafaru | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 13 November 2023 | Published: 23 April 2024

About the author(s)

Fransisco C. Ntjamba, Department of General Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, University of Namibia, Rundu, Namibia
Daniel O. Ashipala, Department of General Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, University of Namibia, Rundu, Namibia
Yahaya Jafaru, Department of Nursing Science, College of Health Sciences, Federal University Birnin-Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: The issue of the mode of entry to nursing programmes and its effect on student success is a key concern among researchers globally. Identifying the mode of entry, which has the potential to improve academic success, decrease the failure rate and lead to the successful completion of a degree, is crucial to increase the nursing workforce.

Aim: The objectives of this study were to assess the association of mode of entry to a nursing programme on student success among undergraduate students.

Setting: The study was conducted at a public nursing education institution (NEIs) in the northeast of Namibia.

Method: A retrospective multi-cohort study was conducted to assess the association of mode of entry on student success. Academic outcomes were analysed, observing two cohorts of nursing students.

Results: Results show that 76.2% (f = 16) of mature-age entry students and 53.7% (f = 29) of direct entry students completed their programme on time. However, 42.1% (f = 8) of access students were expected to return. Female students 56.8% (f = 25) and male students 56.0% (f = 28) completed on time. There was no significant relationship between the mode of entry and completion status with p > 0.05, respectively.

Conclusion: A higher percentage of mature-age entry students was found to complete their studies on time than direct entry and English access entry students.

Contribution: These findings could be used in the revision of student recruitment strategies to select nursing students who are more likely to achieve the best academic outcomes.


Keywords

mature-age entry; nursing programme; student success; mode of entry; undergraduate

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 4: Quality education

Metrics

Total abstract views: 672
Total article views: 583


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.