Original Research

Factors hindering effective uptake of medical male circumcision at Untunjambili area in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Promise N. Sangweni, Thandisizwe R. Mavundla, Pule S. Moabi
Health SA Gesondheid | Vol 24 | a1305 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v24i0.1305 | © 2019 Promise Nhlanhla Sangweni, Thandisizwe Redford Mavundla, Pule solomon Moabi | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 February 2019 | Published: 10 October 2019

About the author(s)

Promise N. Sangweni, Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Thandisizwe R. Mavundla, Department of Health Studies, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Pule S. Moabi, Clinical Teaching Department, Scott College of Nursing, Morija, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Before 19th century, in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, male circumcision was regarded as a right to passage to manhood; however, during the ruling of King Shaka Zulu, circumcision was abolished. It was only in 2010 that it was re-introduced, but this time in the form of medical male circumcision. The aim was to circumcise as many men as possible to avert new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, but few males utilise the circumcision services.

Aim: The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the factors that hinder effective uptake of medical male circumcision.

Setting: This study was conducted at Untunjambili area under iLembe district in KwaZulu-Natal province.

Methods: This qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual study was conducted using in-depth unstructured face-to-face individual interviews at Untunjambili area under iLembe district in KwaZulu-Natal. A convenience sampling method was employed and participants aged between 18 and 49 years participated in the study.

Results: Factors that hinder effective uptake of medical male circumcision are organised into five categories: (1) fear (fear of pain, fear of death, fear of HIV test and fear of delayed wound healing, (2) personal factors (age at circumcision, lack of role models, procrastination and lack of volition, fertility and faithfulness), (3) knowledge deficit on circumcision, (4) influence of culture and (5) natural circumcision.

Conclusion: Factors that hinder effective uptake of medical male circumcision services are manifold. Cultivating a positive attitude towards medical male circumcision can promote uptake of circumcision services and a supportive social support system of men needs to be utilised to encourage men to be circumcised.


Keywords

factor; influence; uptake; circumcision; medical male circumcision; men

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