Original Research

Roles of role players in the implementation of school-based human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome prevention programmes in local high school settings

Constance B. Sekgobela, Doriccah Peu, Maretha de Waal
Health SA Gesondheid | Vol 25 | a1301 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/hsag.v25i0.1301 | © 2020 Constance B. Sekgobela, Doriccah Peu, Maretha de Waal | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 February 2019 | Published: 04 June 2020

About the author(s)

Constance B. Sekgobela, Department of Health Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Doriccah Peu, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Maretha de Waal, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoriaa, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Worldwide, a large proportion of all new HIV infections occur in people under the age of 25. HIV and AIDS remain the leading cause of deaths among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa and second leading cause of death globally. Preventing new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths are at the heart of South Africa’s National Strategic Plan on HIV and AIDS, STIs and TB 2017-2022.

Aims: Explore and describe the roles of the local role players in the implementation of the school-based HIV and AIDS prevention programmes in local high school settings.

Settings: The study was conducted in the Bushbuckridge local municipal area in Mpumalanga Province.

Methods: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive design and contextual study was used. Individual interviews and focus group interviews were conducted with the purposively selected participants from the clinic, health centre, high schools and community members. Data was analysed using Tesch’s method of data analysis.

Results: Although all the local role players were found to have important roles to play in the implementation of the school-based HIV and AIDS prevention programme, gaps exist in the rendering of youth friendly services (YFS); accessible clinic times; HIV and AIDS education; life skills education; Life Orientation (LO) and health education; information sessions; counselling; school health programmes; campaigns as well as collaborative working strategy.

Conclusion: Successful development and collaborative implementation of the school-based HIV and AIDS prevention programme can result in significant changes in knowledge and attitudes that affect sexual behaviour of young people, leading to significant decrease in HIV infection among young people.


Keywords

role players; implementation; school-based HIV and AIDS prevention programmes; reproductive health services; social ecological model

Metrics

Total abstract views: 658
Total article views: 667


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.